Operation Insanity The Dramatic True Story of the Mission That Saved Ten Thousand Lives

$19.99 AUD $10.00 AUD

Availability: in stock at our Melbourne warehouse.

Author: Colonel Richard Westley

Format: Paperback / softback

Number of Pages: 288


In the summer of 1995, the Bosnian town of Gorazde, found itself under attack from Serbian forces despite being designated a Safe Area by the United Nations. Members of the Royal Welch Fusiliers, sent to the area as UN Peacekeepers, began to be taken hostage. Richard Westley, then a thirty-three year old Major, knew he had to act quickly and decisively to have any chance of saving the lives of Gorazde's 45,000 inhabitants. That he did, and was awarded a Military Cross for his gallantry and leadership. Richard's reflections on a horrendous period of modern history are harrowing and unforgettable. However, they are also human, from the gallows humour of the SAS troop to his recollections of the friendship with Selma, a female Muslim interpreter, which sustained him. Two decades on, his story is as relevant as ever, and serves as a true warning about what can happen when the world fails to react with sufficient collective strength.
Vendor: Book Grocer
SKU: 9781786061379
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Description
Author: Colonel Richard Westley

Format: Paperback / softback

Number of Pages: 288


In the summer of 1995, the Bosnian town of Gorazde, found itself under attack from Serbian forces despite being designated a Safe Area by the United Nations. Members of the Royal Welch Fusiliers, sent to the area as UN Peacekeepers, began to be taken hostage. Richard Westley, then a thirty-three year old Major, knew he had to act quickly and decisively to have any chance of saving the lives of Gorazde's 45,000 inhabitants. That he did, and was awarded a Military Cross for his gallantry and leadership. Richard's reflections on a horrendous period of modern history are harrowing and unforgettable. However, they are also human, from the gallows humour of the SAS troop to his recollections of the friendship with Selma, a female Muslim interpreter, which sustained him. Two decades on, his story is as relevant as ever, and serves as a true warning about what can happen when the world fails to react with sufficient collective strength.